12:45 am - Wed, Jul 30, 2014
462 notes
12:39 am
868 notes
12:32 am
120 notes
brianmichaelbendis:

Teela by Gerald Parel

brianmichaelbendis:

Teela by Gerald Parel

(Source: browsethestacks)

12:22 am
272 notes
fang-and-claw:

nativenews:

Peru Legalizes Murder of Indigenous, Environmental Protestors and Activists
Some of the recent media coverage about the fact that more than 50 people in Peru – the vast majority of them indigenous – are on trial following protests and fatal conflict in the Amazon over five years ago missed a crucial point.
Yes, the hearings are finally going ahead and the charges are widely held to be trumped-up, but what about the government functionaries who apparently gave the riot police the order to attack the protestors, the police themselves, and – following Wikileaks’ revelations of cables in which the US ambassador in Lima criticized the Peruvian government’s ‘reluctance to use force’ and wrote there could be ‘implications for the recently implemented Peru-US FTA’ if the protests continued – the role of the US government?
That law, no. 30151, was promulgated in January this year and is, according to the IDL’s Juan José Quispe, a modification of existing legislation passed by the previous government. The modification consists of replacing three words – “en forma reglamentaria” – with another five – “u otro medio de defensa” – which Quispe says means that any soldier or police officer can now kill or injure a civilian without needing to use his or her weapon ‘according to regulations’, or by using something other than his or her weapon.
“We continue considering this law as one that grants the armed forces as well as the national police a licence to kill,” Quispe told the Guardian. “It permits a high degree of impunity. During the repression of social protests, police officers and soldiers who cause injuries or deaths will now be exempt from criminal responsibility.”

In what universe could this possibly be a good idea? Exemption from criminal responsibility in the causing injuries or death??

After reblogging a picture of Machu Picchu, I stumble upon this. Oh, the irony.

fang-and-claw:

nativenews:

Peru Legalizes Murder of Indigenous, Environmental Protestors and Activists

Some of the recent media coverage about the fact that more than 50 people in Peru – the vast majority of them indigenous – are on trial following protests and fatal conflict in the Amazon over five years ago missed a crucial point.

Yes, the hearings are finally going ahead and the charges are widely held to be trumped-up, but what about the government functionaries who apparently gave the riot police the order to attack the protestors, the police themselves, and – following Wikileaks’ revelations of cables in which the US ambassador in Lima criticized the Peruvian government’s ‘reluctance to use force’ and wrote there could be ‘implications for the recently implemented Peru-US FTA’ if the protests continued – the role of the US government?

That law, no. 30151, was promulgated in January this year and is, according to the IDL’s Juan José Quispe, a modification of existing legislation passed by the previous government. The modification consists of replacing three words – “en forma reglamentaria” – with another five – “u otro medio de defensa” – which Quispe says means that any soldier or police officer can now kill or injure a civilian without needing to use his or her weapon ‘according to regulations’, or by using something other than his or her weapon.

“We continue considering this law as one that grants the armed forces as well as the national police a licence to kill,” Quispe told the Guardian. “It permits a high degree of impunity. During the repression of social protests, police officers and soldiers who cause injuries or deaths will now be exempt from criminal responsibility.

In what universe could this possibly be a good idea? Exemption from criminal responsibility in the causing injuries or death??

After reblogging a picture of Machu Picchu, I stumble upon this. Oh, the irony.

12:19 am
7,160 notes
Q: i'm white. does that make me bad?
yllwbrrd

grrspit:

atchka:

grrspit:

lisawithabee:

afro-dominicano:

yea

p much

Why do white people ask questions like this?  Whenever I get this question, or the thematically similar “Do you hate white people” I just answer with “yes”.

Because that’s the only answer they want to hear.

In context, it makes sense. To a lot of white people, being black IS bad. You can see this evident when a white person tells a black person that they’re “one of the good ones.”

Whites allow for nuances in character for their own race. Rarely are white people grouped into “good” and “bad” categories. You can be a white person who is mostly good, then makes a terrible, terrible decision, but your lifetime of goodness mitigates that bad decision. In other words, white people accept that other white people are complicated and people are the sum of their choices, not merely a reflection of a “good” or “bad” moment.

But Whites LOVE to categorize Blacks as “good” and “bad.” You just have to look at the coverage of Trayvon Martin to see that the fact that he was arrested for smoking pot clearly put him in the “bad” camp right away. After that, Martin’s death was framed as him being the “bad” guy and Zimmerman was helpless but to defend himself.

So, when white people ask “I’m white. Does that make me bad?” what they are REALLY saying is, “I’m white. Are you going to hold me to same simplistic, binary judgement system I hold you to?”

Bolding for truth

12:16 am
9,299 notes

(Source: zeroenthusiasm, via xine808)

12:12 am
6 notes
latinorebels:

Machu Picchu, July, 2014 (Photo by Fernando Varela)

latinorebels:

Machu Picchu, July, 2014 (Photo by Fernando Varela)

12:08 am
332 notes
scinerds:


Earth May Be in Early Days of 6th Mass Extinction

Earth may be in the early stages of a sixth mass extinction, an international team of scientists says.
Image: Neil deGrasse Tyson walks over to the ‘The Halls of Extinction’ - Cosmos: A Space time Odyssey
Animals and plants are threatened. More than 320 land vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, the researchers said. The world’s remaining animals with backbones are 25 percent less abundant than in 1500— a trend also seen in invertebrate animals, such as crustaceans, worms and butterflies, the scientists reported.
The previous mass extinction, which wiped out the dinosaurs, happened about 65 million years ago, likely from a catastrophic asteroid that collided with Earth. In contrast, the looming sixth mass extinction is linked to human activity, Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. Dirzo is the lead author of the new review of past research on the topic, which suggests Earth is in the early days of this sixth mass extinction.
A past study, which involved data from the fossil record and modern-day conservation biology, suggested Earth could enter such a mass extinction within the next 300 to 2,000 years. That study was detailed in the March 2, 2011, issue of the journal Nature.
Up to one-third of all vertebrates are threatened or endangered, the researchers said. Large animals — such as elephants, rhinoceroses and polar bears — have the highest rates of decline, which is a trend shared by other mass extinctions. These large animals are at particular risk because they tend to have few offspring and low population growth rates. Hunters and poachers, however, find their fur, meat, tusks or horns attractive targets.
 Losing a species of large animal can have unexpected effects on the ecosystem and nearby human developments, a process known as defaunation. In one study, researchers isolated patches of land from animals, including zebra, giraffes and elephants. Without the animals, the grass and shrubs grew tall, and the soil became looser. Rodents quickly took over and doubled in numbers, eating the seeds from the plants and living in the patchy soil that was relatively predator-free.
Rodents can carry diseases and parasites that infect people, the researchers said.
"Where human density is high, you get high rates of defaunation, high incidence of rodents and thus high levels of pathogens, which increases the risks of disease transmission," Dirzo said. "Who would have thought that just defaunation would have all these dramatic consequences? But it can be a vicious circle."
The decline of big animals affects not only vegetation, but also invertebrates. In the past 50 years, the human population has doubled, and the number of invertebrate animals has dropped by 45 percent, the researchers said. Much of the loss is a result of habitat destruction and global climate disruption, the researchers said.

scinerds:

Earth May Be in Early Days of 6th Mass Extinction

Earth may be in the early stages of a sixth mass extinction, an international team of scientists says.

Image: Neil deGrasse Tyson walks over to the ‘The Halls of Extinction’ - Cosmos: A Space time Odyssey

Animals and plants are threatened. More than 320 land vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, the researchers said. The world’s remaining animals with backbones are 25 percent less abundant than in 1500— a trend also seen in invertebrate animals, such as crustaceans, worms and butterflies, the scientists reported.

The previous mass extinction, which wiped out the dinosaurs, happened about 65 million years ago, likely from a catastrophic asteroid that collided with Earth. In contrast, the looming sixth mass extinction is linked to human activity, Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. Dirzo is the lead author of the new review of past research on the topic, which suggests Earth is in the early days of this sixth mass extinction.

A past study, which involved data from the fossil record and modern-day conservation biology, suggested Earth could enter such a mass extinction within the next 300 to 2,000 years. That study was detailed in the March 2, 2011, issue of the journal Nature.

Up to one-third of all vertebrates are threatened or endangered, the researchers said. Large animals — such as elephants, rhinoceroses and polar bears — have the highest rates of decline, which is a trend shared by other mass extinctions. These large animals are at particular risk because they tend to have few offspring and low population growth rates. Hunters and poachers, however, find their fur, meat, tusks or horns attractive targets.

Losing a species of large animal can have unexpected effects on the ecosystem and nearby human developments, a process known as defaunation. In one study, researchers isolated patches of land from animals, including zebra, giraffes and elephants. Without the animals, the grass and shrubs grew tall, and the soil became looser. Rodents quickly took over and doubled in numbers, eating the seeds from the plants and living in the patchy soil that was relatively predator-free.

Rodents can carry diseases and parasites that infect people, the researchers said.

"Where human density is high, you get high rates of defaunation, high incidence of rodents and thus high levels of pathogens, which increases the risks of disease transmission," Dirzo said. "Who would have thought that just defaunation would have all these dramatic consequences? But it can be a vicious circle."

The decline of big animals affects not only vegetation, but also invertebrates. In the past 50 years, the human population has doubled, and the number of invertebrate animals has dropped by 45 percent, the researchers said. Much of the loss is a result of habitat destruction and global climate disruption, the researchers said.

(via afro-dominicano)

11:58 pm - Tue, Jul 29, 2014
13,734 notes
12:07 am
9 notes
Well, let’s say this Twinkie represents the normal amount of psychokinetic energy in the New York area. Based on this morning’s sample, it would be a Twinkie… thirty-five feet long, weighing approximately six hundred pounds.
Dr. Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis). Ghostbusters (1984). Directed by Ivan Reitman.
11:41 pm - Mon, Jul 28, 2014
4,954 notes

asukalanglee:

The Eva Graveyard

(via r3dvader)

11:31 pm
833 notes

brianmichaelbendis:

 Jim Cheung’s Marvel Comics artwork.

(Source: ungoliantschilde)

11:27 pm
122 notes

aparoids:

"Unbelievable buzzer beater!"

(via fyeahfightinggames)

11:21 pm
2,701 notes

My favorite films | The Animatrix (2003 Shinichirô Watanabe, et al.)
In the beginning, there was man. And for a time, it was good. But humanity’s so-called civil societies soon fell victim to vanity and corruption. Then man made the machine in his own likeness. Thus did man become the architect of his own demise.

(via fuckyeahsciencefiction)

11:17 pm
6,202 notes
fishingboatproceeds:

 ”Get up and fight, sucker!” Ali was yelling at Liston after Liston went down in the first round.
Was the fix in? Did Liston go down on purpose? Still one of the great unanswered questions in boxing history.

fishingboatproceeds:

 ”Get up and fight, sucker!” Ali was yelling at Liston after Liston went down in the first round.

Was the fix in? Did Liston go down on purpose? Still one of the great unanswered questions in boxing history.

(Source: nonconcept)

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