2:29 am - Sat, Jul 26, 2014
2 notes
You can’t resist her
She’s in your bones
She is your marrow
And your ride home
You can’t avoid her
She’s in the air (in the air)
In between molecules
Of oxygen and carbon dioxide
Weezer. Only in Dreams (Rivers Cuomo). Weezer (Blue Album) (1994).
2:10 am
280 notes
bpod-mrc:

25 July 2014
The X File
This deceptively simple image revolutionised molecular biology. It also represents one of the most notorious controversies in science. ‘Photo 51’ was taken by Rosalind Franklin, who was born on this day in 1920. It is an x-ray crystallography image of DNA, created by bombarding a tiny DNA sample with x-rays for more than 60 hours. To most of us, this striped cross might not mean much, but to a few scientists in 1953 it held the secret to the structure of DNA. The controversy surrounds the instant Maurice Wilkins, who worked in Franklin’s lab, showed the photo to Francis Crick, a molecular biologist at Cambridge University, without Franklin’s knowledge. Crick published a paper with his colleague James Watson describing DNA’s double-helix structure. Wilkins, Crick and Watson shared the Nobel Prize in 1962. Franklin, whose peers never accepted her, died of cancer four years earlier, and couldn’t receive the prize posthumously.
Written by Nick Kennedy
—
Image by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond GoslinCopyright held by Oregon State University Libraries
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

25 July 2014

The X File

This deceptively simple image revolutionised molecular biology. It also represents one of the most notorious controversies in science. ‘Photo 51’ was taken by Rosalind Franklin, who was born on this day in 1920. It is an x-ray crystallography image of DNA, created by bombarding a tiny DNA sample with x-rays for more than 60 hours. To most of us, this striped cross might not mean much, but to a few scientists in 1953 it held the secret to the structure of DNA. The controversy surrounds the instant Maurice Wilkins, who worked in Franklin’s lab, showed the photo to Francis Crick, a molecular biologist at Cambridge University, without Franklin’s knowledge. Crick published a paper with his colleague James Watson describing DNA’s double-helix structure. Wilkins, Crick and Watson shared the Nobel Prize in 1962. Franklin, whose peers never accepted her, died of cancer four years earlier, and couldn’t receive the prize posthumously.

Written by Nick Kennedy

Image by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond Goslin
Copyright held by Oregon State University Libraries

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

(via scinerds)

1:59 am
1,173 notes
Has it ever struck you … that life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quickly you hardly catch it going? It’s really all memory … except for each passing moment.
Eric Kandel, “In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind” (via neuromorphogenesis)

(via afro-dominicano)

1:51 am
87,504 notes

tastefullyoffensive:

Anatomy of Songs [wronghands]

I wonder what the Metal, and Progressive chart would look like.

(via fang-and-claw)

1:41 am
15,732 notes

ericscissorhands:

"When super-villains want to scare each other, they tell Joker stories."

(via summershadowtwin)

12:41 am - Fri, Jul 25, 2014
Jueves no te ahueves.
Ecuadorian saying to encourage others to kick-start the weekend on a Thursday.
2:30 am - Thu, Jul 24, 2014
No
Nobody is heard
Compass wilting in the wind
(kcab nrnut t’nod, kcab nrut t’nod)
Nobody is heard
Rowing sheep smile for the dead
Trans-oceanic depths in this earth
In this cenotaph
The Mars Volta. Drunkship of Lanterns (Cedric Bixler-Zavala/Omar Rodríguez-López). De-Loused in the Comatorium.   
1:54 am
1,620 notes
1:48 am
291,763 notes

andrvw:

black licorice isn’t a candy it’s a punishment 

Not if you’re Danish. 

(via artthouhenryvii)

1:42 am
1,962 notes
disneypixar:

Voila!

disneypixar:

Voila!

1:31 am
1,123 notes
explore-blog:

Pioneering astronomer Vera Rubin, who confirmed the existence of dark matter, is 86 today – celebrate with her fantastic 1996 Berkeley commencement address on science and stereotypes.

explore-blog:

Pioneering astronomer Vera Rubin, who confirmed the existence of dark matter, is 86 today – celebrate with her fantastic 1996 Berkeley commencement address on science and stereotypes.

1:19 am
1,383 notes
1:11 am
50,927 notes
1:07 am
4 notes

tallcurvyncurly:

My alarm clock is just jealous of my relationship with my bed.

1:04 am
314 notes
brianmichaelbendis:

Bishop by David Yardin.

brianmichaelbendis:

Bishop by David Yardin.

(Source: thewayilikecomix)

Following
Install Headline